World History And Anthropology: Reader Response: Are Greek Gods Black? Did any Ancient historians claim the ancient egyptians were black? Prove blacks were in south europe The Ancient Greeks were black, world history and anthropology ~~~~

Saturday, 22 February 2014

Reader Response: Are Greek Gods Black? Did any Ancient historians claim the ancient egyptians were black? Prove blacks were in south europe

"Herodotus also asserted that “the names of nearly all the gods came to Greece from Egypt . . . for the names of all the gods have been known in Egypt from the beginning of time . . . It was the Egyptians too who originated, and taught the Greeks . . . ceremonial meeting, processions and liturgies . . . The Egyptians were also the first to assign each month and each day to a particular deity, and to foretell the date of a man’s birth, his character, his fortunes, and the day of his death . . . The Egyptians, too have made more use of omens and prognostics than any other nation. . .”
(Herodotus, The Histories, 149-150; 152; 159).

Well it is quiet obvious that the ancient Greek gods come from ancient Egyptians

The Greek writer Herodotus repeatedly referred to the Egyptians as being dark-skinned people with woolly hair. “They,” he says, “have the same tint of skin which approaches that of the Ethiopians.”

The opinion of the ancient writers on the Egyptians is more or less summed up by French Egyptologist Gaston Maspero The Dawn of Civilization (1894), when he says, “By the almost unanimous testimony of ancient historians, they [the Egyptians] belong to an African race which first settled in Ethiopia on the Middle Nile: following the course of the river they gradually reached the sea.”

Hence it is clear the Ancient Egyptians were indeed black people, there are many other proofs located all over the blog including the 10 points from diop and the melanin test that proved their skin was black, but the unanimous testimony of ancient historians will seem to suffice here.

The German scholar, Eugen Georg, in his book The Adventure of Mankind (1931) p. 121, tells us about the “. . . world-wide dominance of Ethiopian representatives of the black race. They were supreme in Africa and Asia. In upper Egypt and India they erected mighty religious centers and mastered a perfect technique in the molding of bronze — and they even infiltrated through Southern Europe for a thousand years.”

So we know the Ancient Egyptians were black, we also know they believed their gods lived in the south of the foothills in the Nile where they believed they originated from and is supported by substantial dna testing (most likely around Uganda or Congo). And if their gods came from such a region it would be reasonable as well to assume they were black given the context.

Stephanus of Byzantium, who is said to represent the opinions of the most ancient Greeks, says:

“Ethiopia was the first established country on the earth, and the Ethiopians were the first who introduced the worship of the Gods and who established laws.”

Quoted by John D. Baldwin, Prehistoric Nations, p. 62.

But lets look more closely if any ancient support this southern description:

“They (the Ethiopians) say also that the Egyptians are colonists sent out by the Ethiopians, Osiris ["King of Kings and God of Gods] having been the leader of the colony . . . they add that the Egyptians have received from them, as from authors and their ancestors, the greater part of their laws.” Diodorus’s declared intention to trace the origins of the cult of Osiris, alias the Greek Dionysus also commonly known by his Roman name Bacchus. The Homeric Hymn “To Dionysus” locates the birth of Dionysus in a mysterious city of Nysa “near the streams of Aegyptus” (Hesiod 287). Diodorus cites this reference as well as the ancient belief that Dionysus was the son of Ammon, king of Libya (3.68.1), and much of Book 3 of the Bibliotheka Historica is devoted to the intertwined histories of Dionysus and the god-favored Ethiopians whom he believed to be the originators of Egyptian civilization.  [emphasis added]

(1st century B.C., Diodorus Siculus of Sicily, Greek historian and contemporary of Caesar Augustus, Universal History Book III. 2. 4-3. 3)

“They further write that it was among them that people were first taught to honor the gods and offer sacrifices and arrange processions and festivals and perform other things by which people honor the divine. For this reason their piety is famous among all men, and the sacrifices among the Aithiopians are believed to be particularly pleasing to the divinity,”


“The Aithiopians [Ethiopians] say that the Egyptians are settlers from among themselves and that Osiris was the leader of the settlement.The customs of the Egyptians, they say, are for the most part Aithiopian, the settlers having preserved their old traditions. For to consider the kings gods, to pay great attention to funeral rites, and many other things, are Aithiopian practices, and also the style of their statues and the form of their writing are Aithiopian. Also the way the priestly colleges are organized is said to be the same in both nations. For all who have to do with the cult of the gods, they maintain, are [ritually] pure: the priests are shaved in the same way, they have the same robes and the type of scepter shaped like a plough, which also the kings have, who use tall pointed felt hats ending in a knob, with the snakes that they call the asp (aspis) coiled round them.”


“There are also numerous other Aithiopian tribes [i.e. besides those centered at Meroe]; some live along both sides of the river Nile and on the islands in the river, others dwell in the regions that border on Arabia [i.e. to the east], others again have settled in the interior of Libya [i.e. to the west]. The majority of these tribes, in particular those who live along the river, have black skin, snub-nosed faces, and curly hair”.

(Diodous Siculus, Bibliotheke, 3. Translated by Tomas Hagg, in Fontes Historiae Nubiorum, vol. II: From the Mid-Fifth to the First Century BC (Bergen, Norway, 1996))

So it is clear the ancient Egyptian gods were indeed black africans and that the greeks borrowed their gods. So it seems to be quiet clear the Ancient Greek gods were black, ancient historians did describe the ancient Egyptians as black and that an ancient race of black ethiopians did inhabit southern europe and had what was described as world wide dominance as such these black african nations were the first world powers.

In Anacalypsis Higgins makes some interesting claims that all the Greek Gods and Goddesses of Greece were black such as :
"Osiris and his Bull were black; all the Gods and Goddesses of Greece were black: at least this was the case with Jupiter, Bacchus, Hercules, Apollo, Ammon.The Goddesses Venus, Isis, Hecati, Diana, Juno, Metis, Ceres, Cybile, are black. The Multi-mammia is black in the Campidoglio at Rome, and in Montfaucon, Antiquity explained." Page 138
""All the hero Gods Theseus, Bacchus, Æsculapius, &c., were saviours and black saviours too. These black icons were made when man himself was black. He made his God after himself, and then said that man was made after the imageof God.""

So it does indeed appear that the ancient Greek gods were for the most part black, some like Athena are taken directly from Egyptian ones like Neith. It is also clear the ancient Greeks themselves were black because they made these gods as Higgins says in the image of themselves and the gods were black so it i clear the founders and creators of the civilization were indeed black.

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